Moody, California Coast Elopement

High-school sweethearts Erika and Garrett couldn’t let 2020 (and their 10-year anniversary) pass without at least one good thing happening, so when it got to December they decided to plan their elopement in just one week.

With a budget of $1,000, they just wanted to present their authentic selves on the day. They were originally due to get married at Seymour Marine Discovery Center in Santa Cruz, so as they loved their venue so much, decided to hold their elopement ceremony as close to it as they could.

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Unique Wedding Stationery Ideas You Probably Won’t Have Thought Of

Invitation suite by Papier

Your wedding stationery should get you excited. As creators of a print magazine, we think there’s something so extra special about seeing something beautifully designed and printed rather than just in a digital format, and your wedding stationery is no different. Sure, you could just sent a group WhatsApp, or invite people to a Facebook group, but where’s the magic in that?!

If you’re looking for something to truly knock your guests’ socks off (after all it will be the first thing they see to give them an indication of what your wedding day will be like) then look no further than these companies, who are all offering something really unique with their super cool creations.

Paper made from wildflower seeds with The Seed Card Company

Visit The Seed Card Company website // Follow The Seed Card Company on Instagram

Imagine wedding and social stationery and that do not harm trees and actually help the environment! The Seed Card Company offer an inspirational range of six beautifully designed eco-friendly wedding collections, which have multiple design options in each, that include Save the Date cards, Invitations, Information cards, RSVP’s, Menus, Table numbers/Name cards, Orders of Service, Place Settings, and Thank You cards.

They are recyclable, biodegradable, and embedded with a mixture of six wildflower seed types including Bird’s Eye, Clarkia, Black Eyed Susan,
Catchfly, Snapdragon and Sweet Alyssum.

All made from post-consumer waste or recycled pre and post-consumer eco-friendly board and printed with vegan–friendly inks. Partnering with global reforestation effort, Ecologi, means each time a card or stationery suite is purchased, The Seed Card Company and Ecologi will plant a tree.

What better way to have your wedding remembered and live on?

Bold hand drawn designs from Two Tabbies

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Confessions of a Second Time Bride

The wedding industry will have you believe that by achieving wedding day perfection you will ensure your happily ever after. But let’s be realistic for a second, we all know that for some couples, that simply isn’t the case. Being a second (third or fourth!) time bride is nothing to be ashamed of. The good news is that in most cases partners are often wiser and know themselves even better having gone through the wedding – and marriage – process before. Alicia Porter is here to share her experiences of wedding planning second time around.

When I got married the first time in 1996 it was, for lack of a better phrase, ‘planning chaos’. We had location battles, I had a ‘friend’ wanted me to pay her to be a bridesmaid, my mother told me I was too fat for my wedding dress and people constantly wanted to ‘help’ by faxing me pictures of suitable dresses. So, I went on strike. We flew from Alaska to New Zealand and eloped. It was pretty, there were fun cousins nearby, and the florist was a star. The wedding dinner was a random restaurant, and there was chocolate log for a wedding cake. It was wonderful.

My family then threw an elegant garden party reception on our return. However, my parents attitude was it was their party, therefore their choices prevailed. My mother chose the invitations, the cake, the venue and what everyone wore – including me. This is how I found myself in a borrowed dress with a gardenia on my shoulder in a receiving line with outright strangers.

In hindsight, I now realise that although an elopement was easier, the result was we were two very independent people who didn’t know how to work together on big projects. Obviously, this wasn’t the only issue in the relationship, but a lack of being able to work together as a team compounded the fact that the marriage simply didn’t work. Planning for a future together requires work and communication. Child rearing is nothing if not a joint effort. Wedding planning in some respects is a safe practice run to make sure that you know how to work with each other for the bigger picture.

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